[Lifestyle] In South Korea People Check into Prison to Reduce Stress

Browsing through MyFatPocket’s articles and an interesting one caught my eye – ”In South Korea People Check into Prison to Reduce Stress“.

Catchy headlines like these surely does ignite the curiosity of someone!

With the growing immense stress in the contemporary world, how do people actually relieve themselves out of it or at least seek to reduce it?

In South Korea, people actually turn to such forms of reducing stress by seeking relaxation, basically through shutting themselves (almost) out from the busy-buzzing world.

Paying guests are expected to turn in their cell phones, books and other belongings and put on a regulation uniform before checking in.  This is where they will spend most of their time, meditating and silently reflecting on life. There are also private meditation classes, spiritual classes, and ‘healing’ plays conducted as group sessions in the auditorium. A two-night stay at Prison Inside Me costs 150,000 won ($146).

Who would have thought that this was founded by a lawyer named Kwon Yong-seok? How apt and it kind speaks volume isn’t it?

In this article, it was mentioned that people found it difficult to live without their phones, especially a smart one where allows full-blown interaction with other using social media platforms.

If you observe, which need not require a close-up observation and by just putting your own phones down for a moment and take a look around when you’re in the public….how many of us are actually engrossed in our own little world, albeit a virtual one? Most of us would be either texting, surfing Facebook, Instagram, Twittering…surfing the Internet…so on and so forth.

Technology is here to conquer.

Now back to the topic of imprisoning yourself to relieve stress.

Do you find this useful? What do you think of this idea?

Some of us choose to relax by taking a break from work by travelling on a vacation alone or with our loved ones. Some workaholics still continue to carry around their stress while travelling, which sometimes are required of them by demanding bosses/superiors and still continue to work while on a vacation.

Kwon Yong-seok did mention that he and his wife originally envisioned a longer stay for their guests, but people weren’t able to take so much time off. So they had to cut it down to just two days. They also had to make a huge concession – permitting guests to check their smartphones at least once a day.

This is a problem, or the problem.

People actually do know that they are reaching their limit-max and so deserve a break (before they go berserk) but yet they can’t completely give themselves in to relaxation. It may be by choice or out of choice, but whatever it is, this significantly reduces the effectiveness of such assistance.

Also, imprisoning yourself in such places where you lack to discipline to cast your phone away or stressful thoughts may also be well-suited for those who do not or cannot travel for vacations to beautiful places.

But at the end of the day, if you can’t banish all the negativity (stress, fear, anxiety etc) in life (which will never be absolute/complete anyway), there really is a ‘prison inside (of) you’ because your heart and mind are imprisoned by them.